Bliss & Wisdom’s secret connection to Dorje Shugden

中文版

Evidence has emerged that Bliss and Wisdom spiritual leader Mary Jin is a practitioner of Dorje Shugden. Mary Jin, born as Jin Mengrong in northeast China, is the spiritual leader of Fengshan Monastery and Nanhai Nunnery in Taiwan, Great Enlightenment Buddhist Institute Society (GEBIS) in Canada, and other sanghas in Mainland China, Singapore and Canada. She has more than 1000 monks and 500 nuns under her fold.

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Monks bowing to Jin Mengrong on her first trip to Taiwan in Mar 2015. That was the first time pictures of her were released.

The Bliss and Wisdom organization was originally founded by Taiwanese monk Master Jih-Chang in 1991, in order to promote Tibetan Buddhism in Taiwan. Master Jih-Chang, in his many decades as a monk, dabbled in many traditions for years before coming across Tibetan Buddhism. Inspired by the lamrim teachings, he then studied under Geshe Lobsang Gyatso at the Institute of Buddhist Dialectics in Dharamshala, India, becoming a close friend of the Dalai Lama. Master Jih-Chang saw the Dalai Lama as his most important guru. Before Master Jih-Chang passed away in 2004, he gave instructions to Bliss and Wisdom to rely on the Dalai Lama for guidance.

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Master Jih-Chang and the Dalai Lama

Master Jih-Chang and some of his monks became acquainted with Mary Jin on one of their trips to China to teach the lamrim. Master Jih-Chang briefly contemplated appointing Mary Jin as his official successor. The Dalai Lama made his disapproval clear to Master Jih-Chang and the senior monks in a private meeting. That didn’t seem to matter – in Oct 2004, a doctor hired by Mary Jin poisoned the already old and sick Master Jih-Chang in Xiamen, China.

After Master Jih-Chang passed away, Mary Jin was secretly enthroned as the spiritual leader of Bliss and Wisdom by monks who had lost their vows of celibacy to her. Mary Jin, then a Chinese citizen, first attempted to enter Taiwan with a sham marriage, then on a fake passport, but was deported by Taiwanese authorities and banned from entering for five years. Taiwanese monks traveled to Singapore and Canada in order to live with her and receive teachings from her. Finally, in 2015, she made her first trip to Taiwan. After years of yearning and being asked to pray to their mysterious “Successor Guru”, Bliss and Wisdom followers saw photographs of her for the first time.

In May 2017, Venerable Fan Yin, the first abbot of Fengshan Monastery, escaped from the monastery and has spoken out against the organization. Mary Jin has close connections to Dorje Shugden, according to Ven Fan Yin. “The connection with Dorje Shugden had been reported to Dalai Lama and he was not pleased at all. Many Rinpoches knew that Mary Jin is associated with Dorje Shugden.”

“Master Jih-Chang had asked for a Nyingma lama to conduct rituals for Master due to this poor health. The Nyingma lama told Master Jih-Chang that there was something suspicious in his possession, and he was to surrender it, or he would refuse to conduct the ritual. The object turned out to be a ritual instrument of Dorje Shugden, planted by Mary Jin,” said Ven Fan Yin on 21 Jun.

A close inspection of a prayer book used by Bliss and Wisdom reveals references to Dorje Shugden. The photograph below shows a torma offering prayer to spirits. On the second last line, a reference is made to Lord Tee (提公) and Lord Ming (明公), two spirit protectors of Fengshan Monastery. These two spirits were supposedly demons subdued by Mary Jin, who have since been appointed as dharma protectors (please see Ven Fan Yin’s explanation on 21 Jun for more details).

The tormas are also offered to “da li” (大力) in the second last line. “Da li” literally means great strength in Chinese, which is the meaning of the word “Shugden” in Tibetan. Typically, Dorje Shugden is transliterated by sound in Chinese as “xiong tian” (雄天/兇天) or “xiong deng” (雄登/兇登), and usually not translated by meaning. Therefore, most Chinese are unaware that Shugden means “da li” or great strength, and may miss the significance of this.

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A Bliss and Wisdom prayer text for torma offerings to spirits. Dorje Shugden, written in Chinese as “大力”, appears in the second last line. The Tibetan version does not contain references to Dorje Shugden. 

This Bliss and Wisdom prayer text refers to “da li” (大力), or Dorje Shugden, as a dharma protector.

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In the fifth line, “da li” (大力), or Dorje Shugden, is referred to as a dharma protector

The torma offering text is used in the annual Fengshan Monastery monlam festivals, which the 102nd and 103rd Ganden Tripa Rinpoches have presided over in previous years. In what appears to be an attempt to hide the reference to Shugden from the Rinpoches and their accompanying Tibetan monks, no references to Shugden are made in the Tibetan text, although the Chinese text refers to Shugden as “da li“.

On Bliss and Wisdom’s official sangha website, the monks released a statement on 24 July proclaiming,

4. 師父、真如老師、福智僧團禁止供奉雄天,並且從未依止、修持雄天,未來也不會修雄天。

Translated into English:

4. Master Jih-Chang, Teacher Zhen Ru (Mary Jin), and the Bliss and Wisdom sangha have banned the practice of Shugden (now written as “xiong tian“). We have never relied on Shugden, or practiced Shugden, and in future will not practice Shugden.

Really?

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7 thoughts on “Bliss & Wisdom’s secret connection to Dorje Shugden

    1. I suggest you point out where exactly the “lies” are. Perhaps you are referring to Bliss and Wisdom’s official statement – they claim not to be practicing Shugden, but that’s obviously a lie if you look at their prayer books.

      Since you have internet access (which not all the monks in GEBIS are lucky enough to have), why don’t you have a look at all the posts on this blog and educate yourself about the truth.

      Isn’t that what BW likes to do – accuse people of “lying” and “defamation” without ever rebutting their arguments or providing evidence!

      Like

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